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SPUC to appeal Scottish home abortions decision

5 September 2018

Pro-life campaigners have lodged papers today as they mount an appeal after a judge backed the Scottish Government’s controversial plans to allow DIY abortions at home.

The appeal follows a two day hearing earlier this year at the Court of Session, in Edinburgh, which Lady Wise rejected.

The proposal was contested by the world’s oldest pro-life group, the Society for the Protection of Unborn Children (Scotland) which mounted a Judicial Review challenging the plan unveiled late last year by Scotland’s chief medical officer (CMO) Dr Catherine Calderwood.

Speaking after the papers were lodged in Edinburgh, John Deighan, chief executive of SPUC Scotland said:

"While disappointed by the original decision it was always our intention to fight this case all the way. Our position and beliefs remain the same.

"At the original hearing our arguments convincingly exposed the unlawfulness of the actions taken by the Scottish Government in contravention of the law. After thorough consideration of the judgement and in tandem with legal advice we now appeal the decision.

"We owe it to our supporters who continue to make donations to cover our legal costs.

"For the sake of women’s health and the universal right to life we cannot stand idly by whilst such a detrimental measure is implemented in the name of health care.

"The abortion pill policy trivialises the terrible ordeal that medical abortion inflicts on women and it can now do so in an environment where women self-administer powerful drugs with no proper medical supervision or support.

"We continue to be alarmed at the Scottish Government’s policies to liberalise abortion, this is hard to square with their other commitments on health and human rights.

"The effect of so many decades of propaganda and emotional manipulation has clouded the judgment of so many people when it comes to abortion. It is outside the realms of reason to uphold universal human rights on the one hand and then make laws to permit the ending of innocent human lives on the other

"The neglect of the damage that abortion has on women is reprehensible and will one day demand an answer as to why it has been allowed to go on so long. The lax attitude towards abortion has also allowed widespread coercion of women to have abortions.

"Rather than really being about a woman’s choice it has so often become an option which women are pushed towards when their pregnancy is inconvenient to others.

"So many women will afterwards say that they had no choice other than abortion. This compounds the mental suffering that post-abortive women endure."

The CMO’s proposals allow women take an abortion pill at home in the presence of an adult rather in a clinical setting under supervision.

SPUC considered the proposals to be “unlawful” practice and a threat to the health of women and their unborn babies.

The DIY abortion plan involves  sending women from abortion clinics equipped with the drug Misoprostol which they will be able to take in their own house which will result in a termination.

SPUC is fighting  the case on two main grounds which were rejected by Lady Wise.

They state the 1967 Abortion Act lays down specific rules for approved places where procedures can take place and their legal advice stated that the law "was not intended to allow abortions to take place at home".

In addition, their legal advice stated taking  an abortifacient (abortion causing) drug at home “is not consistent” with the Abortion Act which demands the presence of medical, nursing or clinical staff.

Background information

SPUC, the world’s oldest pro-life group, launched its  Judicial Review over the plans unveiled last year by Scotland’s chief medical officer Dr Catherine Calderwood after Westminster devolved abortion responsibilities to the Scottish Parliament in 2016.

She wants to let women take an abortion pill at home in the presence of an adult rather in a clinical setting under supervision.

SPUC consider the proposals to be “unlawful” practice and a threat to the health of women and their unborn babies.

The DIY abortion plan involves  sending women from abortion clinics equipped with the drug Misoprostol which they will be able to take in their own house which will result in a termination.

SPUC fought the case on two main grounds.

They stated the 1967 Abortion Act lays down specific rules for approved places where procedures can take place and their legal advice states that the law “was not intended to allow abortions to take place at home”.

In addition, their legal advice says a woman who takes such an abortifacient (abortion causing) drug at home “is not consistent” with the Abortion Act which demands the presence of medical, nursing or clinical staff.

 

SPUC (Scotland) chief executive John Deighan is available for interview, filming and/or photographs.

Contact us

John Deighan, CEO SPUC Scotland, can be contacted on:

  • Tel: 0141 221 2094
  • Mob: 07802 739265   

Issued by:

Tom Hamilton Communications

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