“Abortion industry undermines parents” says SPUC as Planned Parenthood plots to open 50 clinics inside schools

18 December 2019

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Abortion giant, Planned Parenthood, has revealed its plans to open 50 clinics inside Los Angeles schools. Tom Rogers, SPUC’s Safe at School campaign Officer said: “Embedding Planned Parenthood clinics inside schools is a way to undermine the role and responsibility of parents and directly indoctrinate young people with a pro-abortion ideology.”

As a joint project, the county of Los Angeles will commit $10 million in funding with Planned Parenthood committing $5 million.

Planned Parenthood, is advertising their school clinics as “wellbeing centres.” The clinics will not perform surgical abortions on the school pupils, but plans to offer ‘pregnancy options counselling’, contraception and STI testing and treatment.

Mr Rogers said: “Embedding Planned Parenthood into schools is a way to bypass the role and rights of parents and gain access to children, without parental knowledge. This ploy will not only leave parents in the dark regarding their child’s life, but it also places young, vulnerable people at the mercy of pro-abortion, profit-driven advocates.

“Planned Parenthood is the USA’s largest abortion provider that kills countless children each day. It is disturbing to see them now move their regime into a school setting to be in close contact with other vulnerable young people.”

Safeguarding young people

SPUC’s Safe at School Campaign, which is committed to defending the rights of parents to be the primary educators of their children, has been commenting on the recent cultural shift which removes parents from their role and is placing young people at risk of exploitation.

In 2016, SPUC reported on the findings of the CQC report into the Marie Stopes abortion clinic in Kent, which found abortions were being performed on children with clinic staff explicitly discouraging parental involvement.

The report states: "In the period January – April 2016, across all MSI clinics, 230 children less than 16 years of age were seen but no safeguarding referrals were made. Thirteen children under 16 years of age were treated at the Maidstone clinic." Inspectors raised concerns that staff were obtaining consent from children without proper qualifications and counselling was often done over the phone, with the counsellor having no way of knowing they were speaking to a child.

One clinic worker told inspectors: "The trouble is parents might not react as you think and might be disappointed" and "Parents get upset, we don’t involve them."

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